Saturday, May 26, 2012

Hima, from the ghost in the machine

I'm not sure how my iTunes Library suddenly configured itself to throw this song into view on Thursday. It's been stuck in my head ever since.



I figured out that years ago, I must have downloaded one of the CDs I used at work onto my old computer: Women of Africa from Putamayo. They make great compilation albums of World Music for the classroom. I found this song so compelling I looked up the lyrics, and the whole thing makes me want to sing and cry. I love the singing and crying feeling.

On Wednesday at a staff meeting, the administrators announced the classroom switch that puts me in a classroom on the 6th floor that faces the river.  I think there are three large, gothic windows looking out over the Hudson.  An Educator that I revere taught for a few years in the room next door before she died. She was a Muslin woman from Central Africa, but I can't remember her country.  I remember she taught me the look at the beauty of the moon at Ramadan.




So I'm thinking this song is a message from Mirama, one of the women who showed me how to be a teacher.  The ceilings in this classroom are a little too high for acoustic comfort, so I'm developing a concept that involves suspending bare tree branches, like from birches and something a little darker, and hanging strings of stuff like crystals and temple bells.  That way, when the wind blows in the windows, the bells will ring.  We'll need some fabric draping the branches too.

It's a blessing to be able to turn my attention to creating a classroom environment that incorporates aspects of the natural world.  The room is probably 1,000 square feet, so there's plenty of space for me to include a grown-up area with enough seating for six adults.  We can have parent education cocktail hours.

Hima
Hey you modern woman 
Be ready to leave the Zidaka* 
Hey you woman from the world
We don't have to live like the old generation 
Get up, Get up Don't be afraid 
Free yourself from the shadow And fight for your right 
 Hey you modern woman 
Artificial color in your face it's not enough 
Hey you woman from the world 
We have so much to do 
 Get up, Get up 
Don't be afraid Free yourself from the shadow 
And fight for your right 
Hey you educated woman 
Go on, for sure you will have results 
If you study, you will know how to save yourself 
You will have the key for positive change
Get up, Get up Don't be afraid 
Free yourself from the shadow And fight for your right 
Get up! Because no one is going fight in your place 
Get up! You are going to find people to help you 
Some are going hate you, but you'll be the one we need 
You'll be the one we love 
Get Up, you know it 
Get Up, you are the one we love 


 "Hima" - Get Up
© 1999 NAWAL

* Zidaka is similar to a closet. In the past history of the Comoros, the high-class families honored their oldest daughter by keeping her in a Zidaka, so that others outside the family could not see her until she is married. These girls could not go outside even to see the sun, but could only slip out in the darkness of the night to see the stars and the moon.

7 comments:

Gwendolyn H. Barry said...

BeautiFULL. Thank you for the vid.

Vancouver Voyeur said...

Space, height, and a view, you are blessed.

PENolan said...

Truly blessed - especially when you consider that I get paid to be there. Not much, but the benefits are decent. I may stay there 15 years.

Cali said...

That sounds like a magical classroom! Congratulations, Trish!

PENolan said...

All I can say is: SCORE!
Thanks, though. I'm totally jazzed. Now if I can just get approved by the coop board over on Convent Avenue, I'll be set for life. I'm so grateful and excited I can hardly stand it.

Cali said...

I'm excited, too! (And I don't even get to move out of the upholstered toilet I live in.)

Life As I Know It Now said...

What a beautiful song! Thanks for sharing this with us. :)

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